Research shows that land insect numbers are falling

Research shows that land insect numbers are falling

Research shows that land insect numbers are falling. The world has lost more than one-quarter of its land-dwelling* insects — such as ants, bees, butterflies, grasshoppers and fireflies. In the past 30 years, but freshwater bugs such as dragonflies and mosquitoes have been rallying*, researchers have revealed.

The findings based on 166 sets of data* on more than 10,000 species from 1676 sites in 41 countries. Dating as far back as 1925.

“The decline across insect orders on land is jaw-dropping*,” saying Michigan State University butterfly expert Nick Haddad. who not part of the study. “Ongoing decline on land at this rate will be catastrophic* for ecological systems and for humans,” he said. So, Research shows that land insect numbers are falling.

Insects such as mosquitoes lives in the water as larvae. As well as midges, mayflies, water beetles and caddisflies. That spend at least part of their lives in freshwater. Found to experience a population increase of about 11 per cent per decade.

Freshwater covers only about 2.5 per cent of the Earth’s surface, so the majority of insects live on land.

The number of insects on average declined in the air, in the grass and on the soil surface, but not in trees or underground, the researchers found.

 

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